Task Force For Global Health: 40 Years Of Impact

Distilling the celebrated 40-year history of the Task Force For Global Health – a groundbreaking global organisation – into a short form documentary is no small feat. Doing so involves an assessment of a large archival body of films and the development of a narrative arc that shines a light on the subject’s history, highlights, and achievements.

In 1984 Dr. Bill Foege, Mr. Bill Watson and Ms. Carol Walters (all former colleagues at the Centers for Disease Control) gathered around Watson’s kitchen table to formulate a plan that would change the lives of millions of children by eliminating diseases such as polio, measles and diphtheria. The result was The Task Force For Child Survival, which grew to become the Task Force For Global Health. As the organisation has grown to address the health needs of populations around the world, it has achieved incredible success through the rollout of programmes that have become the gold standard for disease intervention worldwide.

Through a carefully curated selection of historical footage and interviews with the Task Force’s founders, our film distills this impressive 40-year legacy into 7 minutes. The result is a film that details how the organisation has grown to become a leader in global health that has solved some of the toughest health challenges we face, on a scale never accomplished before.

This film was the key presentation at the Task Force For Global Health’s 40th anniversary event, held at their headquarters in Decatur, Georgia, USA.

To see more on our approach to short form documentary films, read this article on how we develop a narrative arc that enables us to incorporate a great deal of detail and history into a short film.


Hannah Waddingham: Justice4Windrush social edit

Emmy Award-winning actress Hannah Waddingham uses her voice and platform for social change, standing in solidarity with Justice4Windrush.

Having grown up in an ethnically diverse environment Hannah is passionate about standing against racism. Hannah is dedicated to raising her daughter with empathy and kindness while ensuring she learns about the history of racial injustice in the UK. Recognising the necessity of formal education on this subject in schools, she is committed to promoting awareness.

About the Justice4Windrush campaign

What started as a discussion between our MD, Steve Maud, actor Colin McFarlane, and Annie Lennox grew to become the fully-fledged Justice4Windrush campaign brought to life through film. Among the prominent voices brought together are Baroness Doreen Lawrence, Former Police SI Leroy Logan MBE, stars of film and screen such as Adrian Lester, Danny Sapani, Eddie Marsan and Jay Blades MBE, and a long list of musical icons such as AJ Tracey, Leee John, Don Letts, Hak Baker, Mega and Cashh, in addition to Windrush activists who have long called for redress.

The Windrush generation refers to Caribbean migrants who arrived in the United Kingdom between 1948 and 1971, in the aftermath of World War II. These individuals were invited to help rebuild Britain after the war and fill labour shortages in various sectors such as transportation, healthcare, and public services. Despite their contributions to British society, they have faced systemic racism, discrimination, and difficulties in obtaining documentation to prove their legal status in the UK.

In 2012 the Home Office’s ‘Hostile Environment’ policy led to the mass violation of rights of the Windrush generation and their descendants. As a result, more than 16,000 British citizens were misclassified as illegal immigrants. Many were wrongfully detained, deported and lost access to essential services.

In giving their stories the platform they deserve, our historic campaign shows how our films can bring people together, bridge divides and level the playing field.


Glenda Caesar: Justice4Windrush social edit

After spending the majority of her life in the UK and dedicating over 20 years of service for the NHS, Glenda Caesar was wrongfully terminated and told she no right live and work in the UK.

One of her sons’ citizenship status was also wrongfully rejected. Glenda was forced to forced to rely on her children for financial support as she was unable to work and had lost access to benefits. The immense amount of pressure and burden that Glenda suffered led her to feeling suicidal. It was only after revealing her story to the media and general public that the Home Office rectified her and her son’s citizenship status. Glenda is a supporter of the Justice4Windrush campaign who continues to use her voice in the fight for justice for the Windrush generation and their descendants.

About the Justice4Windrush campaign

What started as a discussion between our MD, Steve Maud, actor Colin McFarlane, and Annie Lennox grew to become the fully-fledged Justice4Windrush campaign brought to life through film. Among the prominent voices brought together are Baroness Doreen Lawrence, Former Police SI Leroy Logan MBE, stars of film and screen such as Hannah Waddingham, Adrian Lester, Danny Sapani and Eddie Marsan, and a long list of musical icons such as AJ Tracey, Leee John, Don Letts, Hak Baker, Mega and Cashh, in addition to Windrush activists who have long called for redress.

The Windrush generation refers to Caribbean migrants who arrived in the United Kingdom between 1948 and 1971, in the aftermath of World War II. These individuals were invited to help rebuild Britain after the war and fill labour shortages in various sectors such as transportation, healthcare, and public services. Despite their contributions to British society, they have faced systemic racism, discrimination, and difficulties in obtaining documentation to prove their legal status in the UK.

In 2012 the Home Office’s ‘Hostile Environment’ policy led to the mass violation of rights of the Windrush generation and their descendants. As a result, more than 16,000 British citizens were misclassified as immigrants without a legal right to remain. Many were wrongfully detained, deported and lost access to essential services.

In giving their stories the platform they deserve, this historic campaign shows how our films can bring people together, bridge divides and level the playing field.


Jay Blades MBE: Justice4Windrush social edit

Having struggled through racism, poverty and dyslexia Jay Blades MBE has risen to become one of the UK’s most recognised TV presenters and furniture restorers. It’s perhaps no coincidence that his belief in the restoration of objects stems from a belief that humans too can be repaired, fixed and rejuvenated.

Growing up in the working class area of Hackney in London, he first experienced racism at school and has since gone on to champion black artisans and act as a mentor whose example opens up paths for those who have historically been excluded. Using his profile as a prominent personality, Jay Blades has supported and stood in solidarity with the Justice4Windrush campaign.

About the Justice4Windrush campaign

What started as a discussion between our MD, Steve Maud, actor Colin McFarlane, and Annie Lennox grew to become the fully-fledged Justice4Windrush campaign brought to life through film. Among the prominent voices brought together are Baroness Doreen Lawrence, Former Police SI Leroy Logan MBE, stars of film and screen such as Hannah Waddingham, Adrian Lester, Danny Sapani and Eddie Marsan, and a long list of musical icons such as AJ Tracey, Leee John, Don Letts, Hak Baker, Mega and Cashh, in addition to Windrush activists who have long called for redress.

The Windrush generation refers to Caribbean migrants who arrived in the United Kingdom between 1948 and 1971, in the aftermath of World War II. These individuals were invited to help rebuild Britain after the war and fill labour shortages in various sectors such as transportation, healthcare, and public services. Despite their contributions to British society, they have faced systemic racism, discrimination, and difficulties in obtaining documentation to prove their legal status in the UK.

In 2012 the Home Office’s ‘Hostile Environment’ policy led to the mass violation of rights of the Windrush generation and their descendants. As a result, more than 16,000 British citizens were misclassified as illegal immigrants. Many were wrongfully detained, deported and lost access to essential services.

In giving their stories the platform they deserve, this historic campaign shows how our films can bring people together, bridge divides and level the playing field.